Early Detection 1

Included

BLOOD SAMPLE

HIV 1+2 RNA

Hepatitis B (HBV DNA)

Hepatitis C (HCV DNA)

 

 

 

£230 – Cost includes appointment & laboratory charge
Accurate Results from 10 Days Exposure

Early Detection 2

Included

BLOOD SAMPLE

HIV 1+2 RNA

Hepatitis B (HBV DNA)

Hepatitis C (HCV DNA)

Syphilis IgG.IgM

 

 

£260 – Cost includes appointment & laboratory charge
Accurate Results from 10 Days Exposure

QUAD

Included

BLOOD SAMPLE

HIV 1+2 / p24 Antigen

Syphilis IgG / IgM

URINE

Chlamydia

Gonorrhoea

 

£160 – Cost includes appointment & laboratory charge
Please allow a minimum of 21 days between exposure and testing

PROFILE PLUS

Included

BLOOD SAMPLE

HIV 1+2 / p24 Antigen

Syphilis IgG / IgM

Hepatitis B surface Antigen

Hepatitis C Antibodies

Hepatitis C Antigen (early detection)

URINE

Chlamydia

Gonorrhoea

Mycoplasma Genitalium

Ureaplasma

Trichomoniasis

Gardnerella vaginalis

Herpes/Herpes Simplex Virus I/II

 

£420 – Cost includes appointment & laboratory charge
Please allow a minimum of 21 days between exposure and testing

URINE 7 STI TEST

Included

URINE

Chlamydia

Gonorrhoea

Mycoplasma Genitalium

Ureaplasma

Trichomoniasis

Gardnerella vaginalis

Herpes/Herpes Simplex Virus I/II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£320 – Cost includes appointment & laboratory charge
Please allow a minimum of 21 days between exposure and testing

Learn More

There are more infections that cause urinary symptoms than just Chlamydia & Gonorrhoea… STI’s can be caused by virus, fungus, parasite or bacteria. Anyone who is sexually active may be at risk of acquiring an STI. The risk is higher for those with increased numbers of sexual partners, or who have had sex with someone who has/had many partners, or have had unprotected sex.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is the most common curable STI diagnosed
in the UK. Often asymptomatic, anyone who is sexually active is considered to be at increased risk of chlamydia infection. It is the most commonly recognised, screened and treated of all STI’s. Allow 6 weeks before re-testing to avoid picking up the DNA from a previous infection

Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea is caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhea, which multiplies easily in the mucous membranes of the male and female reproductive tract. It can cause serious and permanent health conditions if not treated. Symptoms of gonorrhoea are usually overt in men with white, yellow, or green discharge from the penis. Gonorrhoea can also infect the throat and rectum – individual PCR swabs from each site should be taken to screen for gonorrhoea. Resistance to antibiotics is increasing and treatment is now combined oral and injectable antibiotics. Partners should be treated at the same time with retesting after two weeks to confirm clearance – test of cure is recommended following treatment for gonococcal infections.

Mycoplasma Genitalium

M.Gen is an important sexually transmitted pathogen, detectable only by NAAT tests. Before testing by PCR was available, its prevalence using culture was not recognised or known. It is actually higher than gonorrhoea, and provides ample justification for inclusion in testing for routine STI screening. It is an established cause for male non-CT/GC persistent urethritis, and cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, associated infertility and their various presentations in women. However, many men and women with M. Gen infection will not develop symptoms. Treatment guidelines recommend Azithromycin as first line treatment but M. Gen is becoming increasingly macrolide resistant in up to 40 – 70% of cases, which means that treatment frequently fails. Given the propensity for resistance, test of cure is essential in managing M. Gen infections. The ideal time for retesting is 3 to 4 weeks after treatment.

Ureaplasma

U. Urealyticum and parvum are strains of bacteria that can lead to urinary tract infection and pelvic inflammation. Usually asymptomatic, it is part of the normal genital flora of both men and women. It is found in about 70% of sexually active humans. In males with lower sperm quality, ureaplasma infection could lead to a more pronounced decreased in some seminal parameters and compromise sperm motility

Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis is caused by a tiny parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis – and is one of the most common STI’s worldwide. Frequency of coinfection with other STI’s is well recognised, and notably, infection increases the risk of HIV transmission in both men and women. It is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, infertility, and cervical neoplasia. Some women may mistake this infection for a yeast infection or bacterial vaginosis since the symptoms are similar: frothy discharge, strong vaginal odour, pain on intercourse, irritation and itching. Men can get trichomoniasis too, but they don’t tend to have symptoms. It seems to be linked to male factor infertility. Partners (male or female) need to be treated to avoid ongoing re-infection. Infected women who are sexually active have a high rate of reinfection, thus re-screening at 3 month post treatment could be considered.

Garderella vaginalis

Gardnerella vaginalis is a bacterium rather than a sexually transmitted infection and occurs when the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina is disrupted and replaced by an overgrowth of Gardnerella. Does it matter if it not an STI? Yes, because it can be characterised by a fishy smelling, white vaginal discharge, itching, burning, and irritation, and there are some known pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory conditions associated with Gardnerella as well as a higher risk of getting other STI’s.

Herpes / Herpes SImplex Virus I/II

Genital herpes caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). The virus lives in the nerves and when active it travels to the surface of the infected area and makes copies of itself – called shedding, because new virus cells can at this time rub off onto another person. The virus travels back down the nerve to a ganglion usually at the base of the spine where it lies dormant for a while. It causes painful blisters on the genitalia and surrounding areas. It can be passed through intimate sexual contact and for this reason is referred to as an STI. Once infected, it remains a chronic long term condition with the virus remaining with recurrent activity with variable frequency. There are two types of herpes simplex virus: Type I and Type 2. Both are highly contagious and can be passed easily from one person to another. There is no cure for genital herpes, the symptoms can usually be controlled by antiviral medication. Although using a condom can reduce the risk of herpes transmission, condoms are not 100% effective since herpes can be spread from skin-to-skin.Herpes / Herpes SImplex Virus I/II